Смотреть фильмы онлайн

What is WAYFINDING? What does WAYFINDING mean? WAYFINDING meaning, definition & explanation

   
- HD качество

What is WAYFINDING? What does WAYFINDING mean? WAYFINDING meaning - WAYFINDING PRONUNCIATION - WAYFINDING definition - WAYFINDING explanation - How to pronounce WAYFINDING? Source: article, adapted under https:///licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Wayfinding encompasses all of the ways in which people (and animals) orient themselves in physical space and navigate from place to place. The basic process of wayfinding involves four stages: 1. Orientation is the attempt to determine one's location, in relation to objects that may be nearby and the desired destination. 2. Route decision is the selection of a course of direction to the destination. 3. Route monitoring is checking to make sure that the selected route is heading towards the destination. 4. Destination recognition is when the destination is recognized. Historically, wayfinding refers to the techniques used by travelers over land and sea to find relatively unmarked and often mislabeled routes. These include but are not limited to dead reckoning, map and compass, astronomical positioning and, more recently, global positioning. Wayfinding can also refer to the traditional navigation method used by indigenous peoples of Polynesia. The ancient Polynesians and Pacific Islanders mastered the way of wayfinding to explore and settle on the islands of the Pacific, many using devices such as the Marshall Islands stick chart. With these skills, some of them were even able to navigate the ocean as well as they could navigate their own land. Despite the dangers of being out at sea for a long time, wayfinding was a way of life. Today, The Polynesian Voyaging Society tries-out the traditional Polynesian ways of navigation. In October 2014, the crew of the Hokule‘a arrived on another island in Tonga. Recently, wayfinding has been used in the context of architecture to refer to the user experience of orientation and choosing a path within the built environment. Kevin A. Lynch used the term for his 1960 book The Image of the City, where he defined wayfinding as "a consistent use and organization of definite sensory cues from the external environment." In 1984 environmental psychologist Romedi Passini published the full-length "Wayfinding in Architecture" and expanded the concept to include the use of signage and other graphic communication, visual clues in the built environment, audible communication, tactile elements, including provisions for special-needs users. The wayfinding concept was further expanded in a further book by renowned Canadian graphic designer Paul Arthur, and Romedi Passini, published in 1992, "Wayfinding: People, Signs and Architecture." The book serves as a veritable wayfinding bible of descriptions, illustrations, and lists, all set into a practical context of how people use both signs and other wayfinding cues to find their way in complex environments. There is an extensive bibliography, including information on exiting information and how effective it has been during emergencies such as fires in public places. The term wayfinding is also used to refer to the set of architectural or design elements that aid orientation. Today, the term wayshowing suggested by Per Mollerup is used to cover the act of assisting way finding. describes the difference between wayshowing and way finding, and codifies the nine wayfinding strategies we all use when navigating in unknown territories. However, there is some debate over the importance of using the term wayshowing, some argue that it merely adds confusion to a discipline that is already highly misunderstood. In 2010 AHA Press Published "WAYFINDING FOR HEALTHCARE Best Practices for Today's Facilities", written by Randy R. Cooper. The book takes a comprehensive view of Wayfinding specifically for those in search of medical care. Wayfinding encompasses all of the ways in which people (and animals) orient themselves in physical space and navigate from place to place. The basic process of wayfinding involves four stages: 1. Orientation is the attempt to determine one's location, in relation to objects that may be nearby and the desired destination. 2. Route decision is the selection of a course of direction to the destination. 3. Route monitoring is checking to make sure that the selected route is heading towards the destination. 4. Destination recognition is when the destination is recognized. Historically, wayfinding refers to the techniques used by travelers over land and sea to find relatively unmarked and often mislabeled routes. These include but are not limited to dead reckoning, map and compass, astronomical positioning and, more recently, global positioning.

Вы посмотрели онлайн видео по фразе What is WAYFINDING? What does WAYFINDING mean? WAYFINDING meaning, definition & explanation. Если онлайн видео What is WAYFINDING? What does WAYFINDING mean? WAYFINDING meaning, definition & explanation Вам понравилось и Вы остались довольны, можете оставить комментарий ниже...

Мир в онлайне